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The Dartmouth Brain Imaging Center

History of the Center

In November of 1999, Dartmouth College became the first liberal arts school in the country to own and operate an MRI machine for strictly research purposes. Since then, Dartmouth faculty, graduate students, and undergraduate students have all used the Dartmouth Brain Imaging Center (DBIC) magnet to research everything from free will and morality (Wheatley Lab) to how amygdala dysfunction can lead to anxiety disorders (Whalen Lab), and many, many subjects in between. Non-Dartmouth investigators may also use the center provided they do so under a collaborative agreement with a Dartmouth faculty member.

The DBIC first opened under the direction of Scott Grafton with a 1.5 T GE MRI machine. The center is supported by Dartmouth College and The College of Arts and Sciences and is located in beautiful Moore Hall. Since its opening, DBIC has upgraded to a state-of-the-art 3.0 T Philips MRI machine and Scott Grafton and former Dartmouth Cognitive Neurosciences Director Michael Gazzaniga have moved onto warmer climates at UCSB. Professor George Wolford served as the interim director until the current director, Jim Haxby, arrived in January, 2008.

Center Overview

Dartmouth College is extremely fortunate to have a brain imaging center completely dedicated to research. This focus creates opportunities for undergraduate, graduate, and faculty research available at few (if any) other institutions. Almost half of the undergraduate honor's theses in the last 3-4 years have used the magnet. Most studies are conducted on healthy subjects, although some have been conducted on patient populations. Students are often recruited as volunteers and given a small stipend or "T-points" (which count towards extra credit in some psychology classes) for their participation.

In the past eight years, researchers have performed thousands of scans. Pigs, monkeys, and even a bear head have been scanned for anatomic research, and some generous volunteers have been scanned upwards of 100 times.

Image:Scanner pics 004.2.jpg


Read a Dartmouth News story on the DBIC here.

Imaging Center

About the Imaging Center

Scheduling Magnet Time

Training and Certification (Including Magnet Safety Information)

Downloadable Forms

fMRI Brown Bag Series

Papers and Posters published out of DBIC

What information would you like to see?

Contact Us

Our Magnet

A Brief Pictorial History of Our Magnet

Philips 3T Magnet Information

Artifact Log

  • For tracking the occurrence of corrupted images thought to arise from the magnet hardware.

Troubleshooting

Pulse Sequences

MRI Safety Video.

Imaging Equipment

The Philips Console and Software

Tse Lab Goggles

Projector System

Stimulus Presentation

Recording Responses

Recording Physiology

CEDRUS Lumina System

MR Analysis

Computing Resources

We are working on a guide to Using AFS. Please check back for frequent updates on configuring an AFS client and tips for using AFS more effectively. If you use Mac OS X, there are some tips and tricks Mac OS & AFS that you should know to make it work well for you.

  • MR-Users Mailing List
  • PBS-Chat Mailing List (for discussion of interest to folks in PBS)

Miscellany

Latest Issues of Related Journals

Cognitive Neuroscience and Related Conferences

Training Opportunities

AFNI Workshop -- March 17-19 2009

Useful Wikis of Other Labs

Using the Wiki

This wiki is designed as a source of information and knowledge about MR imaging. Above you will find various links concerning DBIC training and use, magnet information, analysis tips, and other information. In the spirit of wikis, if you find any misinformation or think that there is missing information, feel free to email us at dbic@darmtouth.edu to register and edit the wiki. Or, if you would rather see changes done by someone else, please email me at james.e.dobson@dartmouth.edu.

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